My Son, We’re Waiting.

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My son. We are anxiously waiting your arrival. Any day now, you are supposed to leave the comforts of your mother’s womb and join us. If I’m honest with you, which I’ll try to always be, I’m terrified. I love your sister, I’m deeply in love with your mother and I’m excited to be your father, but raising a son terrifies me. Here are my promises to you:

  1. I will love you, no matter what. My mistakes will be many and I will lose my patience. My flaws are not a result of anything you have or haven’t done, but of my own shortcomings and insecurities. There is NOTHING you can do or say that will keep me from loving you.
  2. You can bring anything to me. I remember being embarrassed or ashamed of certain things I did as a boy and being nervous about talking with my dad. Your grandfather is an amazing man. He taught me much, but there were times I didn’t feel I could approach him. You’ll probably have those times too. Remember son, I love you.
  3. You will always be more important than my work. One of my greatest fears of being a pastor is raising pastor’s kids. This worried me when your mom was pregnant with your sister and it still worries me today. I will miss dinners to be at meetings, will sometimes be gone mornings for Bible studies and will spend plenty of time tucked away in an office studying. Our house will be open, we’ll have visitors and your space will feel invaded. People will call at odd hours and have equally odd expectations of me. I will do my best to set boundaries, but there are times I will fail. First I am your dad, secondly I am their pastor.
  4. I will teach you to love your sister (and your mom, but that will be much easier…). 20150410 ROHDE Family IMG_0116editBW-ZF-10586-03350-1-001-055Your sister is awesome, she will be weird (especially when she’s in middle school), and you won’t always get along. I too am a little brother. I love my sister, your aunt, but I’d be lying if I said it was always easy. There will be times where it seems that your mom and I treat her differently (which we will, the two of you are different people) and it won’t seem fair. She won’t always understand you and will be annoyed by your very existence. But I know your sister pretty well and, much like my sister, I’m guessing she’ll be protective and want nothing but the best for you. Outside of your mom (and eventually your spouse), she will be the most important woman in your life. Love her well.
  5. I will recognize that someone loves you more than I do. My mom told me that the most humbling thing about being a parent is recognizing that God loves your child more than you do. One of your sister’s first lessons to me was proving her grandmother was right. I know God loves you, that he thought of you before you were conceived and that he has plans for you. But I have trust issues (one of my many insecurities and part of the rationale behind your name) so it’s not always easy for me. I will be possessive and, at times, overly protective. I promise that I will do my best to acknowledge that you are God’s first and that my primary duty as your dad is to show you that you are loved by the Creator.

Ella’s Birth Story

NOTE: I have 3-4 posts that I’ve started in the last 2 months and haven’t had time to finish. A newborn daughter will do that. Over the next week or two, I will be posting them. I wrote most of this post on July 18, 2012. 

Today was supposed to be our daughter’s due date. Instead it was Ella Marie’s two-week birthday (and check up with the doc).

Last night Hailey and I sat up talking about how different her birth could have been. Instead of a cooing and growling baby, anticipation and anxiety could have been the culprits keeping us awake. The timing couldn’t     have been better.

On July 3rd, I got home from a long day at work. Around 7:00 Hailey sent a text asking if I would be coming home anytime soon. I thought nothing of it and called her to ask about dinner and if it was okay if I stopped to get gas. She said sure.

I got home and she was making dinner. It was a normal night…or so I thought. Hailey paused every few minutes while cutting vegetables and said she was feeling a little pain and tightness. Then she’d turn back to the veggies.

My wife is a rock star.

She didn’t tell me over the phone because she didn’t want me to worry and she assumed it was just Braxton Hicks contractions. We sat down on the couch, started dinner and within the hour she was arching her back in pain and had set her food down. She called a friend and then the doctor (who told her that she had probably just pushed herself too hard for the day and that she should drink some water and relax). Doctors know best, so I went back to my spaghetti.

While she was on the phone I went upstairs for less than five minutes. I came down and, through tears, she blurted, “DON’T YOU LEAVE ME!” All sorts of craziness ran through my head.

I knew she wanted to have the baby naturally and that our birth plan included the phrase “drug free.” Early in her pregnancy I would try to talk her down off her hippy pedestal. I’d recite my defense, there’s a reason for birth interventions and I wanted to be realistic about what might happen.

She’d always argue and I’d eventually concede (at some point I learned that arguing with a pregnant woman was a bad idea, but it took me entirely too long to get there…sorry dear). And now her practice contractions were causing her to scream at me and cry? Drug free my booty. There was no way she was having our kid without any medication.

By 9:00 she was hanging on my shoulders and wincing in pain. It was never consistent, so we weren’t too sure what to think. I was annoyed. I wanted to go to sleep. I had been up since 5:00 AM and these fake labor pains were keeping us awake. I said, “we’re either going to the hospital or I’m going to bed.” (Yes, I realize this whole interaction makes me look and sound like a complete jerk…). She wanted to go to the hospital.

I went upstairs and got ready to leave, came back down and then instead of getting in the car we decided we’d stay awhile longer. We couldn’t make up our mind. I had read somewhere that a bath helped with Braxton Hicks, so we agreed it would be a good next step. I went upstairs, started the water and then Hailey came up, but she didn’t get in the bath at all. She was already wet. Her water broke when she set foot in the bathroom.

The water breaking was a huge relief. Hailey’s pain supposedly worsened but I never knew. She was uncomfortable, but at least she knew that the baby was really coming right then, that night.

She sat on an exercise ball and I ran all over the house while tears flew down my face. We called the hospital and the doc had already called them saying we would be in later that night. Our parents were on their way. This was really it. The baby was coming.

I figured we’d be in for a long night. All our birth classes had told us to prepare for a marathon. Many of our friends have had kids; we had heard the stories. But none of them prepared me for what happened.

We got to the hospital just before 11:00 PM. Ella was born at 12:48 AM. All my thoughts and our disagreements about birth plans didn’t matter. There wasn’t time for them to. Nor was there time for drugs.

Hailey originally wanted me to be in the delivery room alone with her. She knew I was terrified so she asked our friend Amy, who is a nurse, to join me. Amy was in Indiana and wouldn’t have made it up from San Diego anyway, it was that fast.

Early in her pregnancy I told Hailey that I didn’t want to actually watch our daughter being born. I’d focus on her, coach her through the pain and keep my eyes above the imaginary curtain (the one that hides all the blood and other birth goo…). But I had to watch. Birth is unlike anything else I’d seen.

I cut the umbilical chord (twice), watched the doc clean up my beautiful and crazy tough wife and, after the initial skin to skin time with mom, stood in awe as my daughter squirmed and screamed under the lights of the warmer.

Ella was less than an hour old. I wandered over to Hailey and, as usual, the filter that is supposed to work between my brain and mouth didn’t. I brushed back her hair and said, “You were made for this. That was easy, when do we try for number two?”

To read Hailey’s perspective on Ella’s birth, click here.